Matoke and Groundnut Sauce.

This is a Ugandan staple. Green bananas grow in abundance here and are well loved by the populace. Matooke or matoke as it’s called by Ugandans is the traditional staple for the Buganda kingdom. You can search for videos on YouTube to see how they make perfectly steamed matoke and use the whole banana while at it. I find it so amazing.

If you visit someone from Baganda, you will definitely be served matooke and groundnut sauce alongside other dishes, but the steamed bananas and the purplish tasty sauce made of ground up peanuts HAS to feature.

This is one filling and healthy meal that brings out the real authentic flavour of the green bananas and the groundnuts. It has no added oil or spices, though you may add some if you so wish.

Side note: I’ve noticed peanuts are called groundnuts here. And ground nut sauce (gnut) is not the same as peanut butter/ sauce. Peanut butter is made from already roasted groundnuts, but the gnut sauce is from raw unpeeled groundnuts.

You can choose to grind the nuts yourself or buy the paste then cook it. The cooked sauce is then referred to as ‘Binyebwa’.

Ingredients: I bunch of matoke, two eggplants, one onion, garlic and two tomatoes.

Tip: To avoid the sticky sap that comes from peeling green bananas, peeling them under running water really helps. No blackened hands and knife. 🤗

Peel and clean your matoke and steam. If you don’t have a steamer you can boil, drain, and let the steam evaporate a bit before mashing. I only added salt and pinch of white pepper.
Once ready. Mash your green bananas to a smooth mash and keep hot till ready to serve.

For the binyebwa aka groundnut sauce, I only added salt as I like it as it is with no added spices.

Ground groundnuts. For one cup of the powder/ paste I used about 3 cups of water.
In a non stick sauce pan, add your paste and the water. Let it boil then reduce to a simmer for 30-40 minutes
The sauce will begin thicken and darken as it cooks. Keep stirring so it doesn’t burn /stick at the bottom and also to avoid it getting lumpy.

If it’s too thick for your liking, you can add hot water. Also remember to season it. And let it cook completely. You will know it’s cooked when oil forms on top and it really darkens in color.

The sauce gets a brighter / deeper colour if the peanuts are unpeeled. If peeled. It’s lighter.

Once ready, serve the matoke with the sauce as it is or with any preferred accompaniment.

Steamed matoke and gnut sauce.

I served with baked garden vegetables, (courgette, eggplant, tomato, onions and garlic).

I drizzled the vegetables with some olive oil. Seasoned with salt and pepper and baked for 30 -40 minutes in a 200°C oven.
Final plate: Ugandan style matoke, gnut sauce and garden vegetables.

A tasty and filling veggie laden meal that’s perfect for meatless Monday don’t you think?

I have loads more recipes coming up using this versatile green banana. Subscribe to the blog so you do not miss out, and also check out this other tasty matoke recipes already up, such as my bake n fry matoke, my perfectly stewed matoke and my MIL’s Mix and Mash.

Thank you for your continued support, I really appreciate it!

6 thoughts on “Matoke and Groundnut Sauce.

    1. I’d like to say yes but I know you can grind the nuts yourself 😄🤭. To be honest it will not taste the same as the authentic Ugandan one but you can use it. Though I’m yet to post one matoke recipe you can use peanut butters (the one I posted on WhatsApp group)

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