Cassava Flour Plantain Pancakes.

Where are my fellow pancake lovers at?

This one is for you. This recipe has a twist though, and will work well for those of you who want to enjoy delicious home made pancakes, without having to use wheat flour. I had some really ripe plantains too and couldn’t let them go to waste, resulting in some wickedly yummy pancakes.

Cassava flour works really well in this gluten free recipe with ripe plantains to make a great breakfast, brunch or snack that is tasty, filling, colourful and not hard on your gut.

Don’t they look yummy?

Let’s get started.

Over ripe plantains are best for this recipe, as they have sweetened and mash easily too.

For this recipe we will need:-

  1. 4 really ripe plantains. I had the small ones, for large you can use 2.
  2. 1 1/2 cups cassava flour.
  3. 1/2 cup besan / chickpea flour. Also packaged as gram flour (the one we use for bhajias).
  4. 2 tsp baking powder
  5. Pinch of salt.
  6. 1/3 cup dark brown sugar.
  7. 2 yellow yolk eggs.
  8. 2 cups natural yoghurt, or buttermilk, or maziwa mala.
  9. 1 tsp vanilla.
  10. 1 tsp ground cinnamon.
  11. 1/3 cup coconut oil.
  12. 1 tbsp custard powder.

Note: This recipe makes 15 pancakes, (about 7 inches wide).

Method.

  1. Mash you plantains or puree them, add the sugar, yoghurt, eggs and vanilla. Mix well.
  2. Sift the dry ingredients (the flours, cinnamon, baking powder etc into the wet, add the oil and mix well.
  3. Let rest for 20 minutes.

You will have a thickish batter that look, smells and tastes really good.

Another great thing about this pancakes is you do not have to add more oil, as we already did in the batter, just use a nice non-stick pan to make them and on medium heat.

Heat your non stick pan, and ladle your batter.

These pancakes need more TLC than usual, do not be in a rush. Ladle the batter and spread it a bit like a dosa.
Flip when the bubbles begin to form and the cooked side will look like this.
Once the bottom is cooked you can flip it again for a few seconds to ensure it cooks well on the inside. Remove once golden brown.
The besan flour gives a lovely yellowish tinge to the pancakes as well as added flavour and helps bind the cassava flour too.

Your pancakes are now ready to serve as you wish. Stacked or rolled, with butter, syrup or fruit compote, it is up to you.

Decadence 😋😋

They are healthy, tasty, filling, colourful, use what you have on hand and easy to make which as you know are my checkmarks for an awesome home made meal.

Try them and let me know how yours turned out.

Love,

Wanjoro.

Coconut Pineapple Pancakes.

These cocopine pancakes are insanely delicious, decadent and made with so much love, each bite is just heaven on your tongue. Don’t believe me? Try them and see.

There is something about coconut and pineapple that reminds one of slow lazy days, sunshine, clear skies and love. Make these for yourself or your loved ones and treat yourselves.

The basic pancake batter is an adaption for a fluffy pancake recipe shared by @nyaranyango on Instagram. I changed it up a bit and made the pancakes Kenyan style, more like thickish crepes than fluffy American style. Then filled them with a simple pineapple and coconut compote that is wickedly delicious.

Ingredients:-

  • 2 1/2 cups self raising flour.
  • 1 heaped tablespoon custard powder
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup thick coconut milk
  • 1 cup natural yoghurt
  • 1 tsp chia seeds
  • 3 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 1 tsp vanilla essence
  • A pinch of cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup fresh pineapple juice.

For the compote;

  • 1/2 a medium sized ripe pineapple, diced. (Ugandan pineapples are the sweetest and go in so well in this recipe).
  • 1 big lemon, juiced.
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • A small pinch of ground cloves and ground nutmeg.
  • 2 tablespoons Ugandan honey
  • 1 heaped tablespoon coconut flakes, dessicated coconut will work too.
  • A small splash of vanilla.
  • 1 tbsp cornstarch mixed with 1 tbsp water.

Begin with the pancake batter. In a large bowl, add the coconut milk and sugar and whisk together, then add the coconut oil.

Next all the rest of the wet ingredients, the yoghurt, vanilla, egg and whisk well.

Follow this with the custard powder and flour and mix to a smooth thickish batter. The juice and cinnamon go in last. Set aside for a while.

For the compote, aka the pineapple sauce. Keep the heat low as you make it, to avoid burning.

Heat your small sauce pan and add the coconut flakes. Toast them till they start browning a bit, remove and set aside.

In the same pan, add the butter and as it melts, add the honey, lemon juice, and mix well. When it starts simmering, add the diced pineapple and the ground spices, mix well and cover. Let it cook for 15 minutes on low. The pineapples will remove their juice, soften and absorb the spices and lemon and honey slowly.

Once 15 minutes are up, if the compote is too runny for your liking, add the cornstarch and mix well, finish off with the toasted flakes and vanilla and switch off heat.

Let us now get back to our pancakes. I use a non stick pan and do not add oil as I already added it in the batter.

Heat your pan on medium flame, wipe with a kitchen towel and ladle some batter, then swirl it round. When it gets bubbles on the surface, flip and let cook on the other side. I like mine this golden brown colour. Remove from heat with a spatula and keep on a plate lined with kitchen towel. Repeat the same process until all the batter is done.

Now assemble and serve. I usually put the compote in the middle and fold the pancakes into a triangle shape as seen below.

The pancakes are perfect with a cup of ginger tea. Yum!

If you love coconuts and pineapple, these cocopine pancakes are definitely worth a try.

Terere in Peanut Sauce.

Terere is what we call amaranth leaves in my mothertongue. So this dish is amaranth leaves in peanut sauce.

This dish makes me nostalgic of my uni days when I’d scour through cookbooks filled with recipes, copy some and try them out at home over the weekend. Clearly I didn’t have an active social life back then. 😆

The first recipe I ever saw that called for peanut sauce in greens was from Southern Africa, using pumpkin leaves, which I just had to try out. Thankfully pumpkin leaves were available in our garden and I’ve never forgotten the creamy deliciousness I enjoyed when I attempted the dish.

I like making this as a side dish for ugali. But it can work with other mains as well.

I like amaranth as it’s one of those plants you can consume the grains and the leaves, the grains are ground into flour to make porridge, or puffed to make breakfast cereal, or pressed with honey into cereal bars that make a great snack for kids and adults too. It is easily available and affordable, there is no excuse to not include it in your diet.

Amaranth is not hard to grow and back home grows wild in the farm. They come in green and red varieties.

Terere aka “dodo” as it is known here in Kampala is a nutrient powerhouse, despite being viewed as a lowly vegetable by many. It is high in fiber and iron, rich in vitamin A, protein, calcium, lysine (which enables the body to absorb calcium among other benefits), as well as rich in various vitamins and minerals.

In this recipe, I used two bunches of green amaranth leaves and one bunch of Swiss chard. One onion, three cloves garlic minced, one sliced tomato, and 1and a half heaped tbsp peanut sauce mixed with a bit of water to make a paste, salt and pepper to taste. Spices used were a pinch of paprika but this is optional.

Clean your greens, remove the thick stalks and chop them roughly. Set aside in a colander.

Mix the peanut butter and half a cup of water in a bowl. Till it’s like a smooth porridge.

Heat one tablespoon of oil in a pan. Fry the onion and garlic till soft.

Add the tomatoes and spice and mix well with a pinch of salt.

Once tomatoes are soft, add the greens and mix well.

Once wilted, add the sauce.

Simmer for about 10 minutes. The vegetables will release their water and mix with the peanut sauce into a thick sauce and be tender.

Note: The younger the veggies, the shorter the cooking time as you do not want to overcook them. I like them with some bit of bite left.

Use good quality peanut butter preferably with no added sugar. I like using a local brand that mixes in sesame seeds to them that makes it darker in colour but also adds more flavour.

Serve your vegetables hot with your main of choice. I like having them with ugali and avocado slices on the side. Yum!

Plantain Bread.

Plantain is a very versatile fruit, though we treat it like a vegetable. You can have it grilled, baked, fried, roasted, mashed, stewed or just boiled, and it is good for you. Just make sure you cook it, do not eat it raw.

It is rich in fibre, iron, Potassium, magnesium, vitamins A, C and B6 and tasty too.

If you have some left over, and ripening from yellow to black, fret not, you can still use them in pancakes, porridge (I have an awesome plantain porridge recipe coming soon), and quick bread/ Cake.

I like making simple loaves for the kids’ school snacks or tea time treat. It comes together fast and you can add raisins, coconut, nuts, whatever you fancy.

For a simple plantain loaf, you will need:-

2 overripe plantains, 1 1/2cups all purpose flour, 1 tsp vanilla and 1/2 tsp of tea masala spice (you can swipe with cinnamon), 2 eggs, 1/3 cup brown sugar, 1/2 tsp baking powder, 1/ 4 tsp baking soda, 1/3 cup melted butter, 2 tbsp natural yoghurt, some chia seeds and coconut flakes.

Add the thick batter to a well greased loaf pan and bake at 160 degrees Celsius for about an hour. Start checking at around the 50 minutes mark, as it also depends on your oven and other variables.

It is not so level, but it’s never that serious is it?
The loaf is well baked and slides off the pan so easily, look at that bottom!
The loaf smells amazing and is moist and tasty. Definitely worth a try!

It is a fave in our house.

It tastes even better the next day, and if you want you can make a bigger one in a ring pan and even ice it a bit.

I think every kid likes this part. Other than eating of course. LOL!

For a bigger plantain bread/cake you can double the quantities and bake for 75 minutes.

Note: The riper the plantain the sweeter it is and the sweeter the plantain, the better. Also I do not use a lot of sugar, as we do not like our cakes too sweet.

I like adding coconut in it, finding the flavours blending together pretty well. You can also use coconut oil in place of the butter.

How do you like your plantain?