My Gorilla Tracking Experience at Bwindi Impenetrable Forest, Uganda.

I got to tick off one of my bucket list items last month. Yipee! This trip was more than a year in the making, most of the time I was not even sure if we would actually get to do it. Covid and the most recent Ebola scare had us almost canceling the trip but thankfully we did not. H and I did it. Together. Whew!

My husband is much more fit than I am so you can imagine the pressure I had put on myself to make sure I was in tip top shape for a long hike. We had decided to do our trekking in the hilly Nkuringo sector of Bwindi. It is so scenic, and also one of the highest points of the park.Walking up and down our hilly Kampala neighbourhood, HIIT exercises and even a few pilates sessions got me psyched up and in pretty good shape, or so I thought…

Beautiful sights of crater lakes from the air on the way to Kisoro. Uganda is indeed the Pearl of Africa, such a beautiful and scenic country.

Bwindi Impenetrable National Park is located in south western Uganda, and is home to the last of the world’s mountain gorillas. The forest is dark, dense, cool, steep, beautiful, lush, sounds wonderful with the birds calling out to each other, and stays true to its name “Bwindi” which I was told means darkness.

Sights of the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest from the lodge. Look at how dense it is.

We stayed at the lovely Gorilla Heights lodge, and I will give my experience of the place in a later post. We were warmly welcomed and rested properly the day before the trek.

The Nkuringo sector, where we did our hiking is one of the highest places in the park and home to the oldest and largest habituated gorilla family in that sector, also named Nkuringo. It is quite far from Kampala (about a seven hour drive), so we opted to take a short flight via Aerolink, from Entebbe airport to Kisoro airstrip. This is a great option when you have kids with you so you do not have to spend too much time on the roads that can be tiring for the whole family.

To prepare for the trek one will need:-

  • Well fitting hiking boots.
  • Raincoat /jacket
  • Sunhat and sunglasses
  • Proper and comfortable hiking clothes- long sleeves t-shirt and khaki pants or cargo pants.
  • Gorilla tracking permit- as well as the receipt.
  • Face mask
  • Gloves
  • Walking stick
  • Camera or phone.
  • Packed lunch and some drinking water.
  • Some cash or mobile money to hire a porter.

After an early and hot breakfast at the hotel, we set out for the ranger’s station where we would be assembled with other trekkers and briefed for the hike. The hotel was gracious enough to also provide us with a packed lunch (sandwiches, grilled chicken, fruit and drinking water).

Once we got to the ranger’s station run by Uganda Wildlife Authority, they first confirmed all our permits were in order and took us through the checklist and ensured we were all ready for the trek. This took some time as it also included being briefed about Bwindi forest, how it came to be a park and the various gorilla families found in that sector. The trek involves tracking the habituated gorillas; as they are used to human presence hence safer. The local community has various shops one can buy souvenirs and also offered entertainment via traditional dances to energise us for the hike.

Once the briefing session was over, we got walking sticks and porters for those who wanted and set off on another short 30 minute drive to the starting point of the trek. We were in a group of five tourists, three rangers, one of whom was armed, and all of us had a porter each.

We were lucky to start out in cool weather and no rain. The first few hours hiking were cheery, the air heavy with excitement and high energy as we enjoyed the beautiful sights and crisp fresh air. We passed through several tea plantations that have been planted by the local community, not only as a source of income, but to also act as a ‘fencing off’ strategy to keep the gorillas away from the villages to reduce human wildlife conflict. There are no proper paths one can speak off, we walked across streams, rocks and in trenches on the way. At the same time, our head ranger was communication with her fellow rangers who had been sent ahead to spot where the gorillas were in the forest. Apparently they do not stay in one place too long, or even spend a night in the same place. Once we cleared the tea plantations, we took a breather and time to rest a bit as we took in the forest’s scenic beauty and also prepare ourselves mentally to ascend; we just seemed to be going higher and higher.

Bwindi forest is home to many other animals other than the rare mountain gorillas we were tracking. There are elephants, baboons, various monkey species, hundreds of bird species, and even chimpanzees. We got to hear and spot some birds, monkeys and baboons from a distance. The terrain is rough, slippery, rocky in some places, wet in others and one may have to cross the streams and rivers by wading through. Hence the waterproof gear and hiking boots. The walking stick is important as it helps one maintain balance and also check depth when wading in the water. The long sleeves protect your arms from scratches from the leafy vegetation and the gloves protect your hands from stinging nettles or other plants you may hold on to that may have thorns or spikes.

After trekking for about three hours, I began to tire and slow down. I have never been good with heights and slopes, and as we kept going higher and deeper into the forest my heart was pounding hard and fast. But the thought of being able to see the gorillas spurred me on. The closer we got to where they were, the tougher the terrain, slippery, dense and rocky; this part made me sweat! It was also so quiet, other than the birds and hearing the rangers clear some foliage, the silence was palpable.

We got to a small clearing where we were to leave our bags with the porters and put on our face masks to protect the gorillas from any contagions we may have. We were briefed once more on the need to be silent, take photos and not get too close to the gorillas so as not to agitate them.

My words and these pictures I took with my lil’ phone do not do justice to the experience of seeing the gorillas up close. It was and is still so surreal in my mind. We walked on ahead for a couple of minutes and right there in front of us in the dense forest vegetation was the Nkuringo gorilla family in all its glory.

Mummy, we have some guests.

Some of the gorillas were on the ground, and others in the trees above feeding on wild fruit. The baby gorillas were frolicking about, some were nursing and others practicing their climbing skills. The group had two silver back gorillas. One was on the ground napping, another, the alpha male of the family, was in the trees above, getting some fruit.

If ‘Go away do not bother me” was a person.
Look Mummy, watch me swing!
Rwamutwe the alpha of Nkuringo gorilla family on his way down after getting some fruit to eat in the trees.
Showing us her good side I guess.
Spot the Mama nursing her young right behind me.

The rangers allowed us to have one hour with the gorillas, telling us more about them, letting us take as many photos and videos as we could and all the while ensuring we kept our masks on, didn’t get loud and didn’t get too close to them. We were privileged to spend time with the Nkuringo family which is unique with about 20 members. (You can also read more about the various gorilla families found in Bwindi here).

Nothing like a little afternoon nap after enjoying some fruits for lunch.

The long and arduous trek was definitely worth it to view our gorilla cousins up close. They are so used to humans that some of them seemed to be communicating to the rangers in grunts. A few of the younger gorillas kept climbing up and looking back at us, making me wonder if they were putting on a show for us. Once you are there with them though, you cannot fail to marvel at how big, beautiful and majestic these creatures are. They are so precious yet endangered, with a population of around 1000 found in Uganda, Rwanda and Democratic Republic of Congo. The biggest risk the gorillas face is human; poachers and encroachment into their natural habitats. The reason they need to kept safe is unlike other gorillas, mountain gorillas cannot exist in captivity The Uganda Wildlife Authority in Bwindi as well as other conservation partners are working really hard to protect this precious species and funds collected from our permits as well as donations go towards their protection efforts.

After an exhilarating one hour or so, it was time to move on and let the gorillas be. We left the silverbacks dozing, the baby gorillas playing and swinging around and a couple of them nursing / being fed by their mothers. This is an experience I will never forget and will forever be grateful for the opportunity to see them up close.

Such a beautiful sight. Sublime.

We headed back to where we had left the porters and our walking sticks and bags and began to head back through the dense forest to the pickup point. The way back was no less arduous, it even seemed more treacherous. We had ascended up steep muddy trenches to see the gorillas and heading down was really difficult. Most of us in the group kept sliding and skidding more than once, even ending up on our bums several times due to the slippery terrain. We were however in high spirits after seeing the gorillas so the falls did not discourage us in the least.

When we got to the first clearing where the tea plantations began, the rangers let us have both a lunch and bathroom break as it was far and safe enough from the gorillas and other wild animals. We however had to eat our lunch in a rush as it began to drizzle and we could see some incoming rain clouds a short distance away. Once sated and energised enough we continued on our way back and then my shoes fell apart!

Yes guys, my precious hiking boots that I had had for a while fell apart. I lost the sole on one boot at first. But could still trek, but as we went over the rocks and wet ground, the inner sole got wet and started falling apart too. Luckily I had two pairs of socks on, but on rough muddy and rocky terrain, it was not easy or pleasing. My porter got a shopping bag and tied it round my foot which worked well for some distance but got ripped in the short sharp tea branches. Bummer!

We had to keep stopping and I slowed the group down as I had to now be careful where I stepped to not hurt my foot. As we crossed one of the streams, I noticed the sole on the other boot had loosened too. Our quick thinking ranger quickly tied my straps under and above it to keep it attached to the shoe, which worked for the rest of the trek. It did lower my spirits as nobody ever wants to slow people down, but on the other hand, I was glad it happened on the way back from seeing the gorillas instead of before which would have surely depressed me. I had to find some humour in it to encourage myself to keep walking but it was not easy.

I was both mentally and physically exhausted and I kept telling myself that after this I never ever want to hike again. Some sections were muddy and squishy and all this was seeping to my toes in my right foot. My bum was sore after a few skidding and sliding down the slopes, my thighs on fire, my ankle paining from places where I had stepped into holes that one cannot tell are there due to the dense vegetation. All I wanted at that moment was to get out of there; but I had to keep walking as it WAS the only way of getting out of there!

H and our porter were very patient with me and encouraging, as well as one of the rangers who kept us entertained with stories of the gorillas and interesting things that have happened on gorilla treks. It did cheer me up a bit to hear that hiking boots falling apart does happen more than one would think.

As we neared the place where we had left the vehicles, the hike seemed even more treacherous, I could barely breathe or think straight but guys I did it! After a lot of positive encouragement I finally made it to the vehicle. We buckled up and settled in for the ride back to the rangers’ office to get our gorilla tracking certificates.

Our gorilla tracking experience took a total of seven hours, and it was worth every single minute. We knew that was the most physically challenging sector but also the most scenic to me. The rolling hills, acres of tea plantations, crisp fresh mountain air, amazing views of the impenetrable forest and if clear, the Virunga mountain range, as well as views of crater lakes on the way to Bwindi, it is truly an amazing and enjoyable experience.

We got back to the hotel, tired, happy and still giddy with excitement of the experience. The kids could not wait to see the photos and videos and were also glad to see that we were back safe and sound. I had to throw away my boots, though it was a pity I didn’t get to take a picture of them in their deplorable state but oh well, they had served their purpose already.

Pretty proud of this certificate.

I was proud of myself in the end. This trip had been a long time planning and seeing it come to pass was an amazing experience and privilege that I cannot take for granted. I am grateful that I got to do it successfully and safely. One of the things H and I have always agreed on is to take advantage of the opportunity to enjoy as much of a place as we can while we are still there. Uganda never ceases to amaze me with all its fertile land, delicious food and fruit, scenic beauty and warm hospitality from its people.

Now on to the next bucket list item.

Love,

Wanjoro.

Out and About: Bush Baby Lodge, Mukono.

Bush Baby Lodge is a tranquil lodge located in Mukono, less than 2 hours out of Kampala.

It is the perfect place for a young family to chill out in a natural environment, surrounded by lots of trees, birdsong and fresh air.

Look at how big the grounds are. And are you even in Uganda if there are no banana trees everywhere? 😀

We visited Bush Baby lodge late last year and of all the places we have gone, I would not mind returning for another visit. Maybe because it reminded me of where I grew up.

I loved the vast grounds.

It is no fancy, sprawling resort, but it has many unique offerings. From guided activities for both kids and adults such as bike rides, horseback riding, birdwatching, painting for the kids, lots of kids and adults books to read in case you want to chill out and delicious, healthy, organic food, most of which is sourced from the farm the lodge is located on.

Yes, the lodge is located on a farm guys, complete with its own forest! Which you can walk through, with a guide of course. You can get to see some of the farm animals too. Cows, pigs, goats, donkeys, rabbits, sheep and chickens. And, the kids get a chance to milk the cows! So, if you are a pure urbanite whose kids need to know where milk comes from, this is the perfect place to get up close and candid with them.

The reception area.

We were there for three magical days and I did not want to leave.

There were some traditional dances too, as part of the festive season entertainment.

Sample this: You wake up to the most amazing weaver birdsong right outside your window, head to the dining area for a healthy breakfast spread that includes fresh milk, perfectly made to your preference organic eggs, freshly baked and warm bread, and lots of organic vegetables sides to have alongside your morning coffee or tea. They had some delicious roasted pumpkin cubes one morning, I had seconds and had to ask the chef for the recipe. Which he agreed to give me. Yippee! And lots of fresh fruit options too.

The indoor dining area.
Cute flowerpot.

After the filling breakfast, you can head down to take the kids horseback riding or the farm tour. Then the kids can enjoy themselves on the big playground that includes swings, slides or take one of the lodges’ bicycles for a short ride within the property.

There are also guided fun activities for the kids such as painting eggs, slip and slide water play, among others. As the kids do their thing, get your binoculars and try to see how many bird species you can sport on your own. The lodge has detailed books with pictures, on the birds and flora you can view around the property.

See the food station under the tree, and the kids busy painting eggs.

These activities made you all a bit hungry? No worries. Buffet lunch with healthy, delicious food offerings is set up outside under one of the large trees. You can have your pick of some nutritious soup, fresh vegetables side dishes and some rice or roast potatoes, downed with some freshly squeezed juice.

If you want to take it slow in the afternoon, you can pick a book from their varied selection and enjoy some quiet reading with your cup of coffee or tea, as the kids frolic about or go swimming (more like dipping) in the pool.

The kids’ play area.
More views of the grounds with the pool area in the distance.
There is a brick oven for make your own pizza nights.

Before you know it, it is dinner time. On one of the nights there we were led into the forest, to a large clearing where tables and food stations had been set up under the trees. Nothing beats a nightime barbecue dinner experience. And after dinner, we got to listen for bush babies as well as some woodland owls which are found on the property. This was such a wonderful and exciting experience for both the kids and adults present.

Dining in the dark.

After waiting and finally getting to see one of the owls, you can chill out by the large bonfire and tell each other scary stories or just catch up.

This is one of the areas with a fire pit where you can gather round a huge bonfire under starlight and catch up on some ghost tales.
Our family room was clean and big enough to fit the kids bunk bed in one corner.

One of the reasons I loved Bush baby lodge so much is the amount of activities the kids can get to do, that they may not get to enjoy if in an urban area. Getting muddy, running barefoot in the grass, wide open spaces to roll around in, the farm tour where they get to learn so much and have a practical experience while at it.

The kids got to milk the cows.

The lodge has awesome customer care too. The manager is present and easily available, the guides are all knowledgeable and patient and kind with the kids and also creative at coming up with simple but fun activities for the children.

This was one holiday I actually got to finish a novel from beginning to end; we were all fully occupied in fun and relaxing things to do, and to me that is what makes an awesome holiday experience.

For more information on the lodge, visit their site: https://staybushbaby.com

Out and About: Holland Park, Jinja.

Holland Park is a beautiful lodge located less than 10 km from Jinja town. It is on the western banks of the Nile and not too far from the main road.

It has both self catering accommodation as well as a restaurant that offers several meal options, as well as a beautiful pool the kids could not get enough of.

Swimming with a view. 😍

We visited there over the December break with our friends who had told us about it and guys, they did not lie. The place is really beautiful. They have expansive grounds, great views, well spaced out accommodation, and did I say a lot of space for the kids to run around in?

Look at that view of the Nile!

First thing you will notice is the place is so quiet and serene. Just what one needs for a perfect getaway from the city. They have a lot of friendly dogs on site which is great for dog lovers.

Made a new friend who didn’t want to smile for the camera.
Like the infinity effect of the pool.

We stayed at the stand alone house on one end of the property which was secluded, perfect to chill in and view the amazing sunrise if you manage to be up a bit early.

So pretty!
I couldn’t get enough of the views of the water.

The house we stayed in was perfect for two families or one large one. It was well furnished and comfortable though I loved spending time on the grass outside more than the inside.

The house we stayed in was really lovely!
And well furnished.

It was amazing to walk on the grass, lie down in cool weather or even read a book overlooking the beautiful Nile river. I honestly could not get enough of that view.

New pals.

The hotel also has a fire pit next to the pool and restaurant area which is great when one wants to relax after dinner.

There are not many activities on site in the hotel, but if you are a bird watcher, it’s a perfect place to spot quite a few species effortlessly, so do not leave your binoculars behind. Other than many weaver birds, bee eaters, turaccos, kingfishers and cormorants, we also spotted an Abyssinian hornbill.

An Abyssinian hornbill on the grounds.

There is a a horse riding facility next door, which the kids enjoyed. As well as quad biking, tubing and a waterslide leading to the Nile just a short a boat ride away. The hotel has a small landing bay and one can request for transport across, do activities then cross back to refresh and relax.

Their rates include breakfast which one has to select in advance. Then you can decide if you want to have lunch there or dinner. Their food options were not very varied, which I understand as it is not a big hotel, but the pricing is high for what is offered. I liked their pancakes, their Rolex option (I have posted what Rolex is here) and their creamy pumpkin soup was really good too. The only other meal the kids seemed to really enjoy is their pineapple fried rice which is loaded with chicken strips, cashew nuts, vegetable strips, and raisins.

However there were some downsides, from portion size to limited variety such as no cereal options for breakfast which I found a bit strange. Given that the hospitality industry has taken a severe beating due to Covid -19 regulations, they do seem to be trying after a long period of low to no business, but there were still a few issues that one would expect a hotel or restaurant to have resolved before reopening.

Stock up on your fruit and snacks if with the kids.

We had a lovely time there though. Relaxing in a quiet scenic place is my thing. 🤗

I managed to catch a glimpse of Santa when he came by on Christmas morning. I guess Rudolph was still in quarantine. 😜
Spot the spotted frog?
We got some guests too. Can you spot them?
Cheeky monkeys. At least they stayed out!
The restaurant, reception, fire pit and pool are located in the center of the property. Beautiful and secluded.
Beautiful reception area.
One can walk around or lounge on the big lounging chairs or beds scattered on the grounds.
Well kept grounds one can walk barefoot on.
Not a bad place to be with a good book.

Holland Park is a really beautiful place. A must to visit if you want a quiet, scenic place to relax and enjoy your get away from all the hustle and bustle of the city.

Out and About: Entebbe Wildlife Sanctuary.

The Entebbe Wildlife Sanctuary, popularly know as the Entebbe Zoo, is one of the places one must visit when in Entebbe or Kampala.

It is located in Entebbe, but not that far from Kampala; about a hour’s drive, which makes it an excellent family outing option.

We have been there several times already, but this time round was more special to us as we had yet to see the two Bengal Tigers the zoo acquired sometime last year.

There is a lot to see at the zoo. From chimpanzees, to beautiful lions, cheetahs, giraffes, elephant, snakes, otters and even the elusive Shoebill stork, usually found at Mabamba Bay. I have already written about our visit there here.

There were a few changes we noticed while there. Obviously, there are standard Covid 19 prevention protocols to be observed, the zoo is now charging parking fees, and there is a small vehicle to drive those who do to want or are unable to walk around, (at a fee of course).

There is a big playground filled with different activities for children, a restaurant (that serves some awesome fish) and an area one can picnic at on the shores of Lake Victoria.

This time round though, we just wanted to see the animals. We began at the tiger enclosure. Such majestic creatures.

The lions, cheetah and leopard were all asleep though, I guess it was big cats nap time.

Can you spot the leopard?

They also have a caracal and a serval which I find so beautiful with its black spots, long neck and long legs which make it a great jumper.

The zoo has two rhinos too that are so good at minding their own business, just grazing peacefully.

The kids were fascinated by the tigers, the rhinos which we were lucky to get really close to, the chimpanzees as well as the otters.

It was also our first time to see the otters up close as most times they hide out in the water.

Other fascinating sections were the reptile section, with the snakes and crocodiles.

If you are an avid birdwatcher, you will be able to hear and spot a few birds in the trees as you walk around the zoo. We spotted other animals too that are not part of the captive ones such as vervet moneys frolicking in the trees and a monitor lizard.

How many monkeys can you spot?

There is a botanicals section too, that is very informative on indigenous plants and their healing properties. Sadly this time round the guide was not available and the garden looked a bit rundown but I was able to get a few photos and information. It is one of my favorite parts of the gardens as we get to learn how many plants and trees around us, including some we view as weeds, were actually used in olden times to heal and manage various diseases and disorders. Quite intriguing.

The zoo has many other animals, warthogs, giraffes, baboons, red tailed monkeys, crowned cranes, ostriches, buffalos, waterbucks, a zebra, elephant and many more.

Rothschild giraffes
Ostriches.

PS: I know there are people who do not like going to zoos as they do not want to see the animals in captivity. Well, for me, I see it is a learning opportunity. We get to see many animals and learn about them without having to travel to do so. Travelling to see animals in the wild is not within reach for many. Some of the animals are also rescued from the wild as they are at risk of being poached or endangered, so it is part of animal conservation efforts undertaken by those entrusted to care for them.

Many of the trees around the zoo had signs indicating their names, both local and scientific and if they are indigenous to the region or not.

Some also have installations around them to promote conservation and how to reuse plastics that are a menace to the environment.

These used water bottles are being used as planters for tree seedlings.
These tree base has been reinforced with used soda bottles in the concrete and plastic bottle caps on top.

We all enjoyed ourselves despite being a hot day and the place being quite busy than all the other times we have been there.

When you decide to visit the zoo, wear comfortable shoes and clothing, sunscreen, a hat and sunglasses will not hurt too as there is quite a bit of walking around to do to see the animals.

Definitely worth a visit.

Out and About: Murchison Falls National Park.

Murchison Falls National Park, is one of Uganda’s largest and beautiful game parks. It was established in 1952 and gets its name from the majestic Murchison Falls found within the park.

The park is located in North West Uganda, it covers over 3,800 square km of abundant wildlife, grassland, forests, water features and birdlife to name just a few. This place is not short of attractions to amaze any one who visits.

Located on the Albert Nile, you experience Africa’s largest and longest river, get to hear and see the thundering roar of the World’s most powerful waterfall, and let it drench you. See hundreds of palm nut trees, brought via elephant dung years ago when the elephants began migrating back to the area. Spot giraffes in the savanna grassland, buffalos grazing, elephants headed to the water, lions basking after a successful hunt and feed, come across hyenas in the thickets, spot leopards in the trees, and little oribi antelopes grazing. Visit chimpanzees and enjoy a swim in a lodge as the baboons and warthogs watch on. Enjoy beautiful sunrise and sunset views as you listen to birdsong from the many birds in the area. To name just a few. It is an amazing place that is definitely worth a visit when one is in the Pearl of Africa.

These palms are all over the park, thanks to the elephants’ movement and love for the tasty fruit.

The park is managed by the Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) and their rangers are the best guides when one visits. Murchison Falls N.P is not a one day visit, with so much to see, you can take at least a minimum of three days to be able to enjoy most of its attractions.

Once you head out of Kampala, the first attraction is the Karuma Falls on the Kampala Gulu highway that is on one of the park’s extreme ends. Because it is on a busy stretch of road with some hairpin turns, and due to security reasons, one may not stop on the side of the road, but you will see and hear the water roar, it is a sight to behold. Because of the rock formations and the direction /speed of the water flow, there is so much foam, crashing waves and huge roaring sound that will just amaze you and trust me, I am unable to describe what an incredible sight it is to behold. You will spot some baboons on the road side and various bird species as you head off the bridge over the Nile.

This is the “calm” side of the Karuma Falls.

There are several lodges and camping sights located around the park outskirts, as well as a rhino sanctuary, which is closed to visitors at the moment due to Covid pandemic. There are also a few lodges located right inside the park if you want the full bush experience. This entails baboons, warthogs and waterbucks grazing outside your room door, or hearing hyenas at night as they scavenge after a big cat’s kill. If your lodge overlooks the Albert Nile, you have an amazing view of the water, and hippos and crocs chilling as the other animals head for a drink of water. And if you are in a lodge near the Murchison Falls, you get to hear the water roaring down the whole time.

The must dos are an early morning game drive, you get to see the sun rise over the savanna, as the animals are still grazing and roaming around.

The other must dos are the trip to see the Falls. The top of the falls is just a boat and car trip away, and the bottom of the falls is a 2 hour boat trip, see why you need at least three days? You will only have time at the lodge to eat, sleep and maybe squeeze in a dip in the pool.

Night game drives are also possible, but we opted to do the morning ones. It took us 4 hours and we did not get to cover as much as the park as we wanted to, it is that vast.

We were however lucky to spot patas monkeys, giraffes, hyenas, buffalos, a lone leopard, warthogs, oribi antelopes, Jacksons’ hartebeests, lions, Abyssinian hornbills, elephants, side striped jackal, water bucks, bush bucks, guinea fowl, Ugandan Kob, harrier hawks, Abdim’s storks, grasshopper’s buzzard, palm nut vultures, lilac breasted roller, lapwings, sandpiper, monitor lizards, to name just a few.

How many oribi antelopes can you spot? They are small antelopes that are swift, gazelle like with small horns and a black tail, and apparently a delectable leopard treat.

Our early morning game drive began by a visit to some old ruins of the old Pakuba lodge, that is a known leopard lair, we did not spot any unfortunately but found some antelopes and waterbucks grazing in the vicinity. You will need a 4 wheel drive to manoeuvre some of the road trails due to the heavy rains, some trails and even bridges have been washed away. It was fun seeing who should spot what first. From a lone elephant grazing in the distance, a shy bush buck in a thicket, water bucks in the swampy areas to the birds, all with the sun rising beautifully in the distance.

We came across Abyssinian Hornbills, also known as “pedestrian birds” as they prefer staying on ground rather than the air, Jacksons’s Hartebeest, which I had never seen before, and our ranger guide informed us is quite the forgetful animal.

It is a large antelope with a beautiful golden brown hide and grey horns. They are many dotting the park. We spotted the Patas monkey that is a ground dwelling monkey native to the savanna and woodlands, and the fastest primate when running, going up to speeds of 55km per hour.

The Patas monkey.

Spot the leopard?

We also came across a leopard chilling out in a tree, coming up slowly till it sensed us and climbed down to the long grass and disappeared. Also came across a pride of lions with several cute cubs that were frolicking in the Savannah grassland, such a sight to behold. The ranger informed us they had been born during the lockdown so were not used to the vehicles yet, or human presence. Buffalos spot the landscape, as well Rothschild giraffes.

This calf was not more than three days old. Such a beautiful sight.

Unfortunately, this calf did not survive the day, thanks to a pack of hyenas hiding in a nearby thicket.

They were so well hidden, calculating and waiting for the perfect moment to strike and capture the giraffe calf.
It may look away now, but this hyena was part of the pack that descended on the poor giraffe calf.

As we drove on, we came to another thicket that had tracks leading to it, indicating a carcass had been drawn inside. We drove around the thicket and found this lioness resting after the heavy meal.

The lioness seemed quite unbothered by our presence, guess a heavy meal does take a toll and all she wanted to do was nap in the shade in peace.

Other animals spotted were warthogs grazing peacefully, different birds, buffalos and elephants.

There are earmarked places one can stop to use the restroom and view the Nile up close. This is where we got to see various bird such as African jacana, common sandpiper, lilac breasted roller, lapwings, storks, among others. A Nile monitor lizard and a school of hippos in the water.

Water bucks minding their own business.

The park’s main attraction however are the majestic Murchison Falls. Must do is a boat ride to the bottom of the falls. This takes about 2-3 hours on the calm waters. You will see African fish eagles, Nile crocodiles, many hippos various birdlife and animals headed to the water for a drink.

Such a beautiful sight.
These rock walls are covered by numerous tiny holes that are the kingfisher and bee eater birds’ tunnel nests.

The kingfisher and bee eaters’ tunnel nests are a sight to behold.

An African Fish Eagle.

Apparently years ago, one could get off the boat as you neared the bottom and hike to the top, but this is no longer possible. Heavy rains in recent years have seen water levels rise and the currents get stronger. There are many parts of the park that were accessible a few years ago but now under water.

You know you are nearing the falls when you see the water begin to get foamy and will even feel the boat rock with the heavy currents. Because of rising water levels, we could not get too close.

The visit to the top of the falls was my best experience. Seeing the water, rushing deep and roaring wild, it does something to you. To say the falls are amazing, magnificent and amazing to behold are an understatement to be honest. It is something you just have to experience, and soak in. We were lucky to be the only ones there with our guide and sitting there in silence just watching the water and listening to the thundering roar, is a magical experience.

There are steps you can climb to view the falls from the top and enjoy the water spray as well as a lovely full rainbow that is always there.

I did not want to leave!

The only thing we didn’t do is go to see the chimpanzees but that’s the perfect excuse for a return visit.

If you are in Uganda, and have not visited Murchison Falls, what are you waiting for?

If you are planning a visit to the region, spare a day or two, to experience the beautiful Murchison Falls National Park. It is worth it!